What is EEFI?

Essential Elements of Friendly Information (EEFI) are defined as the answers to an intelligence agent’s questions about your system, support, deployments and force protection, otherwise known as the mission. Some examples of the questions they want to answer relates directly to your critical information listing (CIL). What is America’s space capability now and in the immediate future? Can Peterson Air Force base protect NORTHCOM? Does the Air Force care about its people? What measures will the Air Force take if their computer systems or installation are attacked? The program we all know as OPSEC is the program to deny your enemy the answers to these questions. OPSEC protects our official use and controlled unclassified information.

The purpose of the OPSEC program is to reduce the vulnerability of Air Force missions from successful collection and exploitation of your critical information providing the adversary answers to their critical questions surrounding Peterson AFB. OPSEC applies to all activities that prepare, sustain, or employ forces during all phases of your operations.

Do you post recall rosters in your cubicle? Do you post your retirement orders with your social on your overhead or desk in the open? Do you copy personal checks on the office copier and throw them into a recycle bin? Do you tear out your notes on a sensor system management meeting on future state space operations and put them into a dumpster or outdated recycle bin under your desk? Do you shred 100% of all official information? Do you shred your personal information at home? Do you have a unsecure router at home while you work on official business? Do you use a personal flash drive at work? Do you or your family members talk about your mission to your friends and young children at home with access to the internet? Do you allow your family to post deployment pictures on a social engineering sites located on the internet? Do you blog with unknown folks on the net and talk about the military and vent about weaknesses of leaders you witness on base? These are all examples of vulnerabilities that everyone in the Air Force must consider. I recommend a ready, aim fire approach to protecting information. The game Tic-Tac-Toe comes to mind. How does it apply to OPSEC?

OPSEC can be seen by your adversary as a game of tic-tac-toe. If you use OPSEC preventing collection of intelligence you place the “X” in the center square. Be smart, be a hard target. Make sure your folks use and think OPSEC and place that “X” in the center square. Ensure the answers to your enemy’s questions to go unanswered.

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